thecivilwarparlor:

The Gun Crew of the 2nd Colored Light Artillery
In March of 1863 Congress established the Medal of Honor as the United States highest award for military valor. Eventually 23 black servicemen—16 soldiers and 7 sailors—would receive the prestigious decoration for gallantry in action during the Civil War, a striking testament to the service and sacrifice of African American volunteers in our nation’s bloodiest conflict.

thecivilwarparlor:

The Gun Crew of the 2nd Colored Light Artillery

In March of 1863 Congress established the Medal of Honor as the United States highest award for military valor. Eventually 23 black servicemen—16 soldiers and 7 sailors—would receive the prestigious decoration for gallantry in action during the Civil War, a striking testament to the service and sacrifice of African American volunteers in our nation’s bloodiest conflict.

thecivilwarparlor:

Photograph Of Unidentified Buffalo Soldier With Rifle And Knife
From: Photographs Of Afro-American Soldiers, Yale Collection Of Western Americana
Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth Kansas. Though African Americans have fought in various military conflicts since colonial days.
Sources disagree on how the nickname “Buffalo Soldiers” began. According to the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum, the name originated with the Cheyenne warriors in the winter of 1877, the actual Cheyenne translation being “Wild Buffalo.” However, writer Walter Hill documented the account of Colonel Benjamin Grierson, who founded the 10th Cavalry regiment, recalling an 1871 campaign against Comanches. Hill attributed the origin of the name to the Comanche due to Grierson’s assertions. The Apache used the same term (“We called them ‘buffalo soldiers,’ because they had curly, kinky hair…like bisons”) a claim supported by other sources. Some sources assert that the nickname was given out of respect for the fierce fighting ability of the 10th Cavalry.Still other sources point to a combination of both legends. The term Buffalo Soldiers became a generic term for all African-American soldiers. It is now used for U.S. Army units that trace their direct lineage back to the 9th and 10th Cavalry units whose service earned them an honored place in U.S. history.
Main article: 10th Cavalry Regiment (United States) § Buffalo Soldier name

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Soldier
 

thecivilwarparlor:

Photograph Of Unidentified Buffalo Soldier With Rifle And Knife

From: Photographs Of Afro-American Soldiers, Yale Collection Of Western Americana

Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth Kansas. Though African Americans have fought in various military conflicts since colonial days.

Sources disagree on how the nickname “Buffalo Soldiers” began. According to the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum, the name originated with the Cheyenne warriors in the winter of 1877, the actual Cheyenne translation being “Wild Buffalo.” However, writer Walter Hill documented the account of Colonel Benjamin Grierson, who founded the 10th Cavalry regiment, recalling an 1871 campaign against Comanches. Hill attributed the origin of the name to the Comanche due to Grierson’s assertions. The Apache used the same term (“We called them ‘buffalo soldiers,’ because they had curly, kinky hair…like bisons”) a claim supported by other sources. Some sources assert that the nickname was given out of respect for the fierce fighting ability of the 10th Cavalry.Still other sources point to a combination of both legends. The term Buffalo Soldiers became a generic term for all African-American soldiers. It is now used for U.S. Army units that trace their direct lineage back to the 9th and 10th Cavalry units whose service earned them an honored place in U.S. history.

 


"1st Lieutenant Alvin Anderson, one of the many repatriated Prisoners of War to return home aboard the USNS Marine Phoenix, embracing his mother and sister as other members of his family look on. Fort Mason, California, September 14, 1953.”

"1st Lieutenant Alvin Anderson, one of the many repatriated Prisoners of War to return home aboard the USNS Marine Phoenix, embracing his mother and sister as other members of his family look on. Fort Mason, California, September 14, 1953.”

thecivilwarparlor:

Company E, 4th United States Colored Infantry at Fort Lincoln, Washington, D.C. Library of Congress-Theirs was one of the detachments assigned to guard the nation’s capital. 
By the end of the Civil War, roughly 179,000 black men (10% of the Union Army) served as soldiers in the U.S. Army and another 19,000 served in the Navy. Nearly 40,000 black soldiers died over the course of the war—30,000 of infection or disease. Black soldiers served in artillery and infantry and performed all noncombat support functions that sustain an army, as well. Black carpenters, chaplains, cooks, guards, laborers, nurses, scouts, spies, steamboat pilots, surgeons, and teamsters also contributed to the war cause. There were nearly 80 black commissioned officers. Black women, who could not formally join the Army, nonetheless served as nurses, spies, and scouts, the most famous being Harriet Tubman who scouted for the 2d South Carolina Volunteers.

thecivilwarparlor:

Company E, 4th United States Colored Infantry at Fort Lincoln, Washington, D.C. Library of Congress-Theirs was one of the detachments assigned to guard the nation’s capital. 

By the end of the Civil War, roughly 179,000 black men (10% of the Union Army) served as soldiers in the U.S. Army and another 19,000 served in the Navy. Nearly 40,000 black soldiers died over the course of the war—30,000 of infection or disease. Black soldiers served in artillery and infantry and performed all noncombat support functions that sustain an army, as well. Black carpenters, chaplains, cooks, guards, laborers, nurses, scouts, spies, steamboat pilots, surgeons, and teamsters also contributed to the war cause. There were nearly 80 black commissioned officers. Black women, who could not formally join the Army, nonetheless served as nurses, spies, and scouts, the most famous being Harriet Tubman who scouted for the 2d South Carolina Volunteers.

thecivilwarparlor:

Unidentified African-American Civil War Soldier
Tintype of unidentified African-American soldier, possibly from the 29th USCT (United States Colored Troops)
In actual numbers, African American soldiers comprised 10% of the entire Union Army. Losses among African-Americans were high, and from all reported casualties, approximately one-third of all African-Americans enrolled in the military lost their lives during the Civil War. According to the Militia Act of 1862, soldiers of African descent were to receive $10.00 a month, plus a clothing allowance of $3.50. Many regiments struggled for equal pay, some refusing any money until June 15, 1864, when Congress granted equal pay for all black soldiers.
Credit: Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library

thecivilwarparlor:

Unidentified African-American Civil War Soldier

Tintype of unidentified African-American soldier, possibly from the 29th USCT (United States Colored Troops)

In actual numbers, African American soldiers comprised 10% of the entire Union Army. Losses among African-Americans were high, and from all reported casualties, approximately one-third of all African-Americans enrolled in the military lost their lives during the Civil War. According to the Militia Act of 1862, soldiers of African descent were to receive $10.00 a month, plus a clothing allowance of $3.50. Many regiments struggled for equal pay, some refusing any money until June 15, 1864, when Congress granted equal pay for all black soldiers.

Credit: Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library

operationbarbarossa:

A member of a British Crusader tank crew with a tortoise they found while traveling in the Western Desert - 13 April 1942.

operationbarbarossa:

A member of a British Crusader tank crew with a tortoise they found while traveling in the Western Desert - 13 April 1942.

titovka-and-bergmutzen:

A Panzerleutnant of the Afrika Korps holds a pigeon. Unusually, he wears his Iron Cross 2nd Class ribbon on the pocket buttonhole and a single large panzer skull. He’s also wearing a zip-up sweater underneath.

titovka-and-bergmutzen:

A Panzerleutnant of the Afrika Korps holds a pigeon. Unusually, he wears his Iron Cross 2nd Class ribbon on the pocket buttonhole and a single large panzer skull. He’s also wearing a zip-up sweater underneath.

thecivilwarparlor:

As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, Susie King Taylor was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. 
She was hired by the 1st South Carolina Colored Volunteers and worked for more than three years nursing wounded soldiers, as well as teaching those who could not read or write. She was the first Black Army nurse. She organized African American women, including Sojourner Truth and Harriet Tubman, to care for sick and wounded black soldiers during the Civil War.
She tended to an all Black army troop named the First South Carolina Volunteers, 33rd Regiment, where her husband served, for four years during the Civil War. Despite her service, she was never paid for her work. She established two schools in her lifetime.
Susan died in 1912 at the age of sixty-four in Boston and she is currently interred at Mount Hope Cemetery in Roslindale, Massachusetts.

thecivilwarparlor:

As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, Susie King Taylor was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. 

She was hired by the 1st South Carolina Colored Volunteers and worked for more than three years nursing wounded soldiers, as well as teaching those who could not read or write. She was the first Black Army nurse. She organized African American women, including Sojourner Truth and Harriet Tubman, to care for sick and wounded black soldiers during the Civil War.

She tended to an all Black army troop named the First South Carolina Volunteers, 33rd Regiment, where her husband served, for four years during the Civil War. Despite her service, she was never paid for her work. She established two schools in her lifetime.

Susan died in 1912 at the age of sixty-four in Boston and she is currently interred at Mount Hope Cemetery in Roslindale, Massachusetts.